1920swoman

Just another WordPress.com site

Archive for May 2011

Feminist Party Discriminates

leave a comment »

” The response of the National Woman’s Party to the disenfranchisement of African-American women illustrates that women’s identity as women does not always transcend other differences or make women more sensitive to the discrimination faced by other disadvantaged groups. The campaign for women’s suffrage was fraught with conflict over the issue of race. Many white suffragists did not want to antagonize southern supporters of the suffrage movement by endorsing African-American women’s right to vote. While the Nineteenth Amendment, which gave women the right to vote, was ratified in 1920, black women still found themselves unable to exercise their new rights (Race Issue Hit Feminist Party, Microfilm Reel 28.)” 

Advertisements

Written by A New Generation of Women

May 2, 2011 at 5:04 am

Posted in Uncategorized

The African American New Woman

leave a comment »

“In an era of lynchings and segregation, many black women struggled to define their gender identity and sexuality in an empowering way. The Harlem Renaissance played a huge part in African cultural life. Sexuality was more a terrain of liberation for African American women than white women. During the 1920s, glamour permeated the black community. Many black artists stressed the beauty of black women and beauty parlors and cosmetic sales soared (Clash of Cultures, African American New Woman.)”

However, some black women had the assumption that white    would always be better so they insisted on purchasing skin  lightening creams as well as hair straightening products. It was  difficult for black women to be accepted during this time,  especially following traits of the “new woman.”

Jazz singer, Bessie Smith was an influence towards African American women. She was a flapper of the 1920s and flaunted sexuality and pleasure, glamourous attire, and flouted convention.

Written by A New Generation of Women

May 2, 2011 at 12:32 am

Posted in Uncategorized

An Opposition

leave a comment »

“Many people opposed to the new woman phenomenon of the 1910s and 1920s. Alarmed by such vulgar behavior, many people wanted the old-fashioned morals to be taken into action that the younger generation had discarded of. Critics of the new woman, men and women, were joined together in hopes of bringing the Victorian standard conduct back. The Young Women’s Christian Association aided urban women to attend in religion, boarding schools, gymnasiums, and homemaking courses to expel attention on modern-life society. Parents were welcoming due to the increase in being unable to control their daughters. (Clash of Cultures, Sexuality.)”

Overall, the way a typical white “new woman” flaunted herself to society was unaccepting and shun upon. The morals were displeasing and parents were unsatisfied with the way that their daughters had become. Modern-city society had caused an outrage. The Victorian era seemed to have disappeared and the people, men and women, wanted to bring it back to recognition. Women behaving in such a way has caused an era of controversy that seemed to go unsettled.

Written by A New Generation of Women

May 1, 2011 at 11:54 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Sexual Revolution of the 1920s

leave a comment »

The concept of the new woman during the 1920s underwent a sexuality connotation. Different from the Victorian era, a middle-ground of prostitution and not having sexual encounters, emerged from the unmarried women. Parents as well as the police force did not approve of this change. However, the irony comes out when certain police women were also the “new woman” who had stepped out of the traditional gender roles. Various differences occurred amongst women generations and for every woman who rebelled against her mothers orders another  probably was chose to restraint. Marriage was seen continuously throughout generations. During the 1910s and 1920s, women preferred to be heterosocial and saturated with heterosexuality. These women could flirt and date in just about any atmosphere of amusement. This caused a decline in the Victorian’s new woman social realm of activity.

Remaining at the fringes of these changes in sexual norms in the twentieth century were prostitutes,radical women, and lesbians, revealing significant historical continuity in sexual behavior and thought. Women of the Bohemian middle class began to question marriage and explored “free love.” Also, birth control pioneers, socialists, and feminists often paid a price for violating the sexual normality. Young women were not simply discarding the norms of their mothers’ generation, though, but adapting them to the changing landscape of modern American life. Many women chose marriage and motherhood over dating and pleasure.

Written by A New Generation of Women

May 1, 2011 at 11:33 pm

Posted in Uncategorized